State-by-State Overview: Rules for Changing Gender Markers on Birth Certificates
Updated: December 2016

Our communities need substantive and dramatic change in the hearts and minds of people writing and enforcing public policy. As one participant in the Atlanta focus group put it: “They have to see us as people in order to consider protecting us in a way that matters.”

Our communities need substantive and dramatic change in the hearts and minds of people writing and enforcing public health policy, providing health care, and making hiring decisions. As one participant in the Miami focus group said, “It’s not only HIV testing, it’s not only giving out condoms. Our community needs some kind of strength. We need housing. Food. Healthcare.”

In order to identify community needs and advocacy priorities, we conducted a needs assessment in the summer of 2015. The needs assessment was released online and made available across the U.S.

The last four years have been a hellstorm for trans people. In almost every crucial setting in a person's life, from healthcare to housing to employment, the Trump administration tried to cut our chances at survival.

Sex work is work. Sex workers are legitimate workers. As Black and brown transgender sex workers, we demand the full decriminalization of sex work and the end to the stigma, violence, and policing that plagues our communities. It is impossible to be genuinely committed to ending violence against trans communities, particularly trans women of color, without a commitment to decriminalizing sex work.

Many families learn transphobic violence from our dominant culture, which conditions people to be hostile to children who diverge from behavior associated with their assigned sex. While many of our families come from lineages that celebrated trans people, European colonizing entities have introduced transphobia into our homes, creating divides among generations.